NEWS

Fields with solar panels not eligible for farm subsidies

Published October 21st, 2014

Farmers will lose their right to claim subsidies for fields filled with solar panels under new plans to ensure more agricultural land is dedicated to growing crops and food. The move will help rural communities who do not want their countryside blighted by solar farms.

Britain has some of the best farmland in the world and ministers want to see it dedicated to agriculture to help boost our food and farming industry that is worth £97 billion to the economy.

The change, which will come into effect from January 2015, will mean that farmers who choose to use fields for solar panels will not be eligible for any farm subsidy payments available through the Common Agricultural Policy for that land.

Environment Secretary, Elizabeth Truss said: “English farmland is some of the best in the world and I want to see it dedicated to growing quality food and crops. I do not want to see its productive potential wasted and its appearance blighted by solar farms. Farming is what our farms are for and it is what keeps our landscape beautiful.

“I am committed to food production in this country and it makes my heart sink to see row upon row of solar panels where once there was a field of wheat or grassland for livestock to graze. That is why I am scrapping farming subsidies for solar fields.

solar

“Solar panels are best placed on the 250,000 hectares of south facing commercial rooftops where they will not compromise the success of our agricultural industry,” she added.

The subsidy change will  save up to £2 million of taxpayers’ money each year. The reform follows other government measures designed to end support for solar farms in agricultural fields and renewable energy subsidies for new large-scale solar farms will end next April.

Earlier this year, the Department for Communities and Local Government amended planning rules to ensure that whenever possible solar installations are not put in fields that could be used for farming.

The changes the government is making are expected to slow down the growth of solar farms in the countryside in England. There are currently 250 installed, with the biggest covering as much as 100 hectares. Under previous plans, the number of fields dedicated to solar farms was set to increase rapidly, with over 1,000 ground-based solar farms expected by the end of the decade across the UK. These changes should help to halt this expansion as it will now become less financially attractive for farmers to install the solar panels.

For more details contact the renewable energy team  at Berrys.

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More about Kamil Ciesluk


BA
Agency Co-ordinator
Tel: 01536 532394
Mobile: 07799 901278
kamil.ciesluk@berrys.uk.com

Kamil graduated from University of Szczecin with a bachelor’s degree in Environment Protection in 2006 and chose to move to United Kingdom. He continued his education in the UK at Tresham College in Kettering. Kamil joined Berrys in 2014 as a Renewable Energy Consultant. He advises on all aspects of renewable energy installations including feasibility studies, planning advice, grid connection applications and connection agreements, metering, Power Purchase Agreements and project management of installations.

Whilst working on renewable energy generation projects, Kamil has gained a wealth of experience in project management and co-ordination of multiple contractors. He is now also assisting with preparation and submission of planning applications including preparation of CAD drawings.